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Woman attacked, robbed at Fayette Pavilion

Fayetteville Police are looking for a suspect who attacked a Fayetteville woman Saturday morning in the parking lot of the Kohl’s department store located at the Fayette Pavilion.

The April 27 incident occurred at approximately 10:07 a.m. as the customer exited her vehicle and walked towards the door, said Det. Mike Whitlow.

Whitlow said the woman was approached by a black male, 16-20 years of age, 5’7”-5’9” in height and a very thin build. The man was wearing black pants, a black shirt over a red shirt, black shoes and a black baseball cap with a red bill and logo, Whitlow added.

Whitlow said the man grabbed the victim by the collar and threw her to the ground. He then took her purse and fled, running north through the Kohl’s parking lot toward Pavilion Parkway. The victim suffered injuries to her arm and neck. She was treated at the scene by paramedics, said Whitlow.

The incident at Kohl’s was captured on store video and the suspect was seen walking in the store prior to the robbery, Whitlow said.

Fayetteville Police and Fayette County deputies searched the area but were unable to locate the suspect. Fayetteville Police believe he may have had a vehicle waiting in the Dick’s parking lot and may have tried to rob someone there a few minutes before he walked to Kohl’s, Whitlow said.

Anyone with information is urged to contact Det. Mike Whitlow at 770-461-4441.

Below are composite security camera shots of the suspect.

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Comments

"experts" will learn that cameras at eye level just might identify the perps.

Robert W. Morgan's picture

The whole idea was to hide the cameras and surprise the thief. This new wave of urban terrorism and armed robbers does indeed need more visible cameras as a deterrent and to identify the thug. Probably going to be a day when you will have to pass through a metal detector just to go shopping.

Live free or die!

G35 Dude's picture

Hasn't this type thing happened here before. Kohl's I mean?

You can't use logic with an illogical person.

Cyclist's picture

Yup. There was a car-jacking not long ago. Some obvious patterns are developing.

Caution - The Surgeon General has determined that constant blogging is an addiction that can cause a sedentary life style.

I think the other incident was a manager getting robbed after leaving the store at closing with all the cash in her possession.

This is why my wife won't go to the Pavillion without me and I always carry whenever I go anywhere in Fayetteville anymore. The thug-rapper-wannabees have turned the Pavillion into a cesspool and it won't be long before it suffers the same fate as Shannon and Southlake.

The animals are out of the cage and they are out out of obamo-bucks and obamo-phones and now they are out to get yours.

Be careful out there people. Always know your surroundings and profile. All of the recent thefts in the area have one common denominator.

NUK_1's picture

It's definitely already in progress and won't be that long before it's like Abandoned Mall or Southlake or Greenbriar.

The Fayette Pavilion put a real hurt on Abandoned Mall and Southlake, but where are all the losers going to head next? Ashley Park in Newnan is way too far away from their normal locale(and a lot of Newnanites pack heat) and I don't see the PTC Avenue as a place they end up either.

I looked at the crime in the last 5-6 years around the Pavilion and inside and it's sickening. You have an armed robbery at RBC right across. Another at Bank of America. Yet another at Bank of America. A kid on his bike getting jacked at the Bank of America in Banks Station. A Kroger employee hit over the head in the parking lot at Banks Station. A shootout at Wal-Greens. All the crap going on within the Pavilion itself. Car chases. Thuggery in the Kohl's parking lot twice recently.

I think that shopping mecca is down for the count. NCG opening just outside of PTC also eliminated a lot of people from having to go to the Pavilion to see a movie, and they've never been busted for a rodent infestation and don't have excessive loitering either. It's shame.

When that place was built, I swear there was supposed to be a police/fire precinct right there at the entrance. There IS a FD location there, but I don't think they ever staffed the police part of it, ever. Maybe I'm wrong, but that might have helped years ago to stop the influx of crime that is now happening and isn't going to end. Regardless of that, when you are that close to the clayco line and you have desirable anything, they will come for it and drag what was once nice into utter crap eventually. For reference, see Greenbriar, Shannon/Abandoned Mall and Southlake. It never changes.

Robert W. Morgan's picture

Better yet - do it now. Put some police in the empty shops and in the parking lot and elsewhere. Video every single move everyone makes and shoot or taser them when then do something. Then charge them with a crime and fine them for the lost sales tax because of the customers they frightened away. Could be a big bucks grab for the county. And good target training for the police.

Live free or die!

kcchiefandy's picture

...as a single - especially - female is a prime target for cowardly scum. I'm 6'1", 220 lbs. so have never been bothered; these cowards prey only on the - potentially - easy marks. Pepper spray & other weapons should be readily handy for those venturing out alone. Agreed - the Pavilion has attracted scum from nearby areas.

Atlanta southward towards Fayetteville, Peachtree City, Sharpsburg and Newnan. To be replaced with nail salons, massage parlors and rooms to rent by the hour.

hutch866's picture

When something happens in PTC, all you hear is crickets, but when something happens in Fayetteville, all the PTC people can't wait to offer an opinion.

I yam what I yam

What is happening is frightening. I don't understand why, in this day and age, retailers in some areas of FC feel they don't need better security. When one shops in Beverly Hills, on Rodeo Road even, there are security guards at the front door of most stores; hidden cameras within the store, and plenty of police on the streets. Those shopping in these stores are not 'thugs' - or at least not dressed like thugs. There are not 'thugs' in the Beverly Hills neighborhood or even close to the neighborhood - but it has been the experience of the store owners that dishonest people will try to steal - even in the so-called best of neighborhoods. Shoppers in Beverly Hills feel protected - so they continue to shop there. I admit that the prices that are charged in Beverly Hills allow the owners the ability to afford security - but they are maintaining the confidence of their customers that they will be safe while in the store and in the area. (And even then - there is crime in Beverly Hills) I'm in the Pavilion on week days in the afternoon. The parking lots are reasonably full; the majority of the customers do not look like 'thugs' to me. . . but even tho there is a police station in the Pavilion, I'm beginning to doubt the 'security'. Store owners - are you going to 'beef-up' security or 'run'? The economy is improving - but people only spend money where they feel secure.

We need to develop shopping skills that are used in larger cities:
1. Don't park in areas where there are no cars
2. If possible, don't carry a purse. (You see very few young girls with purses these days - their phones and wallets are elsewhere.)
3. If possible, don't go to the Pavilion or any shopping area alone or when there are few people in the parking lot or the store.

I'm afraid that more women are going to 'carry' here in Fayette County - and more will be practicing their 'martial arts' skills. I worked in an urban area for many years - and felt safe here in Fayette County - but it looks like I'm going to benefit from the survival skills I learned in 'urban' areas. I'm not leaving Fayetteville - but I will travel to shop where I feel secure. <CITE>And that's not necessarily PTC, Newnan or anywhere 'close'. They have valet parking in Atlanta; great variety of stores; terrific restaurants - and SECURITY</CITE> Sad.

S. Lindsey's picture

..as most dangerous.

Sad is not the word I would use...

"Whoever claims the right to redistribute the wealth produced by others is claiming the right to treat human beings as chattel."

-Ayn Rand

Not anywhere near Lakewood Neighborhood. Valet parking, guarded entrance, great restaurants, choice of stores.

[quote=Davids mom]I don't understand why, in this day and age, retailers in some areas of FC feel they don't need better security. </CITE> Sad.[/quote]

It's the store owners fault for not having enough security! We need to be more like Beverly Hills and have better security, not arrest the thugs that are terrorizing our citizens!

If the owners of the Pavilion and the store owners increase the security then the innocent consumers will pay higher prices for products to compensate for the additional cost. It's would be just another tax on the middle class due to the continued thuggery in our fine city.

Yeah, lets not address the root cause of the problem which is poor parenting, single parent households, and a violent thug culture. Let's punish the innocent and make them pay for more security.

There are many who are working to correct the causes of crime in our world. Poverty is one of the causes. Cut budgets, furloughs, austerity programs where the poor and middle class lose jobs and the rich receive bonuses, cutting police and fire services,does not appear to be the answer to our crime problem. Maybe treating your neighbor as you want to be treated; facing the reality that crime is existent throughout our country- and middle class/upper middle class neighborhoods are targets and being aware that Fayetteville and Peachtree City are middle class targets is an answer that will keep residents of these two beautiful cities safe. There are those who 'watch' for those times when our small but mighty law enforcement are not in the area. We, as owners/customers need to deal with the reality of the times and do all we can to make our experience in our shopping areas secure. In the meantime, there are organizations in our community that are working hard to combat the societal problems that contribute to crime. Community churches and FACTOR are doing a wonderful job in Fayette County-and owners providing more security and we,being vigilant customers, will assist in keeping our Pavilion a great place to be! It's called working together!

kcchiefandy's picture

Economies will rise and sink; it's their nature. Blaming constrained services and rich people for crime is ludicrous, at best. Commiting a crime is a personal choice, regardless of the reason(s), compelling or otherwise (I lean toward the 'otherwise' reason they're commited). PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY, or the lack there of, is the primary cause. This simple building block of character starts at HOME. The failure to institute it is directly the fault of the parents, period.

Criminal acts are a learned behavior; most children aren't enbedded with the innate knowledge of how to steal or rob - that comes from their environment. Blame lays firmly on this doorstep.

As long as you don't mind businesses passing along the cost, to you, of 'providing' more security, I guess I'll agree on that point. Law-abiding citizens will be well advised to be aware of the surroundings when out, go out with someone, when shops are busier, keep a personal defense item in hand, and prepare to make criminals pay for their actions.

I know many who would prefer to pay A LITTLE extra for security here in Fayetteville than spend the gas money to drive to Lenox! (But remember, many can also 'shop' on the net and save gas money) Successful business areas are areas where consumers feel safe. As for the other societal problems, I agree - home, church, community, school all need to teach and demonstrate those practices that most of our young people try to emulate. Each individual needs to ask themselves - would I want my child, neighbors child, etc., to act as I do?

I did some research in opening a business in The Perimeter - a diverse middle/upper middle class shopping area north of Atlanta. I checked the crime reports. Pick pocketing, grab and run, robbery and burglary all reported. There were empty store fronts at the time of my research. I have no idea why - but there is increased security in this particular mall today. Did the increased security stop all crime? No. But consumers felt safer and as the economy improved, customers continued to shop there. Your suggestions regarding personal responsibility while shopping anywhere are well taken. Some teenagers shared with me this suggestion. Take out your phone while walking - as if you are talking to someone - and if you feel intimidated act like you may take a picture!!! I don't know if I have the nerve to do that - but anyway - I noticed that our teens are very seldom alone - anywhere!

While I do understand your remark about single parent households, not every single-parent household
contributes to violence in our society. I am a single parent of a 15YO, soon to be a 16YO.
He is a Life scout - one rank away from Eagle, a youth leader at his church, a Wind Ensemble
member as a high-school freshman (now a matter of days before auditioning again for his placement in
Wind Ensemble), and a 7-time athletic champion in 3 different sports in this county (as a rising
sophomore at Sandy Creek, he is currently training up for a second football title during his tenure
there and his eighth championship title overall) and maintains acceptable grades and behavior. They
anticipate college scholarships for him in both music and athletics, and then career football. Single
parenting can be done quite successfully, but, in his case, it has not been done alone, all by me;
many thanks to his hands-on and very involved church leaders, scout leaders, coaches, etc. Many
good men have stepped up for my son and helped make a huge difference in his life by helping him
develop the skills and his particular talents, so that, ultimately, he will continue to contribute
to society productively.

RKS's picture

[quote=Joe Kawfi][quote=Davids mom]I don't understand why, in this day and age, retailers in some areas of FC feel they don't need better security. </CITE> Sad.[/quote]

It's the store owners fault for not having enough security! We need to be more like Beverly Hills and have better security, not arrest the thugs that are terrorizing our citizens!

If the owners of the Pavilion and the store owners increase the security then the innocent consumers will pay higher prices for products to compensate for the additional cost. It's would be just another tax on the middle class due to the continued thuggery in our fine city.

Yeah, lets not address the root cause of the problem which is poor parenting, single parent households, and a violent thug culture. Let's punish the innocent and make them pay for more security.[/quote]

I have to agree with Joe on this one. (Everyone take a collective sigh on that one!) Putting a bandaid on the gaping bleeding artery of crime in the Pavillion by asking the stores to pay for the security will not do much to fix the problem. I don't go to the Pavillion alone, in fact, I rarely go anywhere in F'ville alone anymore. My fine city has been Ghettofied and Thuggerfied and is no different than Riverdale. DM assumes this woman didn't park in a safe place or made herself an easy target? That's not fair....since we don't know that, let's not assume that. Not carry a purse? That's not the answer either. For me, if I am shopping alone, I go to Griffin, PTC or Newnan, which means my tax dollars, which should stay in my fine city, don't. However, I need to feel safe and I don't feel safe here anymore.

Pull the crime rates for Spalding and Griffin and compare and contrast them to Fayette and Fayetteville and get back to us.

Sigh! LOL

[Quote]My fine city has been Ghettofied and Thuggerfied and is no different than Riverdale[/quote]

I don't agree. And I think that law enforcement, store owners, and we as Pavilion consumers in Fayette County can work together to make the Pavilion safe.

RKS's picture

[quote=Davids mom]Sigh! LOL

[Quote]My fine city has been Ghettofied and Thuggerfied and is no different than Riverdale[/quote]

I don't agree. And I think that law enforcement, store owners, and we as Pavilion consumers in Fayette County can work together to make the Pavilion safe.[/quote]

Well, that sounds like a good plan, but I have lived her for about 30 years now and this town has gone down the crapper. I will be glad to see how everyone works together to make is safer. In the meantime, I will shop where I feel safe and that is NOT the Pavillion.

Do we feel the safety of our small town of Fayetteville is going away day by day? I love Fayetteville and have lived here for many years. I shop in Fayetteville at the Pavilion often, eat out, go for walks, but I refuse to live my life in fear. I am always aware of my surroundings and careful with every step I take. When I am at the Pavilion and see a Fayetteville Police car I am grateful and wave, just to let them know I see them. With only 4-5 Police Officers on duty per shift (this doesn't include Detective's), remember the marked units are patrolling the ENTIRE city limits. The Pavilion is inside the City limits even though the FCSO does patrol and ride through. It could be worse, Fayette County could have local news media here nightly reporting. Thank a Police Officer next time you see them, as I do appreciate them working to keep me safe. They can only be in one place at a time, driving through our subdivisions, answering calls for assistance, working a traffic accident, or what ever they are dispatched to. Let's be pro-active when it comes to crime, where we shop, keep your eyes open, and always be safe...

It seems like whenever there is an influx on non-whites crime and degeneracy seem to follow. I decided to do some research and found some pretty interesting data.

NeighborhoodScout.com recently released a study of the Top 25 Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in America. Their report can be found here: http://www.neighborhoodscout.com/neighborhoods/crime-rates/25-most-dange....

Here's how NeighborhoodScout developed its list:
"Even the most dangerous cities in America can have relatively safe neighborhoods, as there is more variation in crime within most cities than between cities. But using exclusive data developed by NeighborhoodScout, and based on FBI data from all 17,000 local law enforcement agencies in America, we here report those specific neighborhoods in America that have the highest predicted rates of violent crime per 1,000 neighborhood residents of all. Violent crimes include murder, forcible rape, armed robbery, and aggravated assault. These neighborhoods are the epicenters of violence in America, where social issues are likely to ignite into violence and spread."

Regrettably, NeighborhoodScout.com didn't include racial demographics for these neighborhoods. Luckily, the real estate website Moveto.com does supply such demographic data for zip codes where these most dangerous neighborhoods are found. Not only that, but Moveto.com gives you an incredibly detailed list of important demographic, property valuation, crime index, and owner vs. rental data that will help homeowners avoid making a huge mistake when moving to a city.

By simply cross-referencing NeighborhoodScout.com with Moveto.com, it was simple to produce a detailed racial breakdown of those neighborhood's labeled "America's Most Dangerous."

Of those 25 neighborhoods:

•Eight of the 25 had black populations greater than 95%
•11 of the 25 had black populations greater than 90%
•14 of the 25 had black populations greater than 75%
•21 of the 25 had black populations greater than 50%
•Four of the 25 were located in Detroit, all with black populations greater than 90%

So what are the practical ramifications of this research? I'll let you draw your own conclusions. Just remember, facts aren't racist.

S. Lindsey's picture

...You used reason, logic and well facts to come to a reasonable conclusion, but you are not supposed to do that. "Those" facts have to be ignored..it's not a problem in the "Community" it's a problem with Republicans or the TeaParty or "certain" minority of white people who hasn't crawled out of the 50's.

Thinking and reasonable people know that the "whole community" is facing a major problem and that a majority of violent crimes are being committed by blacks.

Now we can ignore it, excuse it, blame reporting of it racism and even tar the ones that dares say it as racist.

All the while we see more and more purse snatchings, robberies and murders happening everywhere.

The number one factor will be blamed on jobs... and whose fault is that?

Welfare barely allows you to survive while teaching you no skills, kills any incentive and generally makes the person dependent and makes the person feel insignificant and useless..

But Democrats and spineless Republicans just keep on adding to it thinking throwing more money at the problem will make it all go away.

I suppose we could do as Zimbabwe did and make everyone a Millionaire... but how much is a Millionaire worth then?

"Whoever claims the right to redistribute the wealth produced by others is claiming the right to treat human beings as chattel."

-Ayn Rand

when I go to moveto.com

You might also examine the SES of these areas for an explanation of the high crime rates. Remember that correlation does not always indicate causation. People of means (regardless of race or ethnicity) rarely commit violent crimes.

Cyclist's picture

So much for the success of the War on Poverty and other legacy give-aways.

Caution - The Surgeon General has determined that constant blogging is an addiction that can cause a sedentary life style.

[Quote]In 1969, just 2.8 million Americans received food stamps. Today, over 47 million Americans are on food stamps. The Fox News special explained that one contributing factor to the massive expansion of the food stamp program is the crony capitalism that has cropped up around the anti-poverty program[/quote]

Uh, there's been a recession and involvement in wars since 1969. More middle class parents are grateful for food stamps then ever before. People are still out of work or under employed. Do we let these families starve their children like in the days of Hoover?

PTC Observer's picture

Then, just perhaps, they will get off their duffs and take the place of all the illegals in the workforce we have in this country. You know actually work instead of taking a government dole? If there isn't a government dole we actually may see the rebirth of personal responsibility. Who knows?

kcchiefandy's picture

...they aren't 'illegals' anymore; they're 'Obamagrants'!

You have really immersed yourselves in the Lee Atwater ideology.

S. Lindsey's picture

...just saying.

"From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs"

"Whoever claims the right to redistribute the wealth produced by others is claiming the right to treat human beings as chattel."

-Ayn Rand

kcchiefandy's picture

...I lean toward the fear of our nation becoming a 'beggar, beggar, beggar' than the other word you're alluding to.

Understand.

The teacher whose husband lost his job and is now under employed - and their combined salaries for a family of six qualifies them for foods tramps - they should get off their 'lazy' duffs and get more work to feed their four children? Or let their kids starve? This economic crisis is not just hurting those who in your mind are non-deserving leeches. Better management of welfare is needed- but there are no quick fixes. We need a Congress that can work with the elected executive branch of our government. This political mess is hurting our country and our future. While we witness the political fallout of the sequester - top level executives are receiving bonuses. Why?

kcchiefandy's picture

...a teacher (an honorable but not overly-paid field) and her husband - what was the job he lost? True - there are many decent folks who've been hurt in this economy. Oh, did I mention my wife was unemployed for 8 months after she came back from A-Stan (USAR Soldier), but applied & interviewed constantly until she found an office management job paying far below what she's worth (2 degrees, loads of work experience)? She didn't even file for unemployment, and I'm not exactly a millionaire. Given, we don't have 4 kids, but we sacrificed and avoided the handout route.

Your example gives about a tenth of the story; no judgements, of course, but it'd be interesting to find out how big a house & what kind of cars they drive. Oh, and they should have expected a tight budget w/ 4 kids, unless one of them is in a professional field (i.e. Dr, lawyer, upper mgmt, etc...).

Top-level Execs compete w/ other top-level peers; given their packages are obscene, but in a free market it's the nature of the beast. Don't like it; campaign to boycott their product & services and don't subscribe to their offerings. You're not going to affect them any other way.

([Quote]an honorable but not overly-paid field[/quote]

Most teachers have two degrees . Where are teachers overly paid? True, teachers don't enter the profession to get rich, but compared to their responsibility and need to constantly take courses and/or workshops to remain current, I think they are grossly under paid.

kcchiefandy's picture

*

kcchiefandy's picture

...I said NOT overly-paid; i.e. they do not receive the compensation (most) that they deserve (please remember I taught for a short time!).

Thanks for the correction! We do agree here! Sorry for the misunderstanding.

If the working taxpayer's money is going to be taken from them by force to feed the mouths of people too lazy to get a job or people that milk the system, then taxpayers should have some say in what food can be purchased with foodstamps.

Vegetables, Fruit, rice, potatoes, milk, cereal, and perhaps some meat and chicken should be the only items that people are allowed to purchase.
Children are getting too fat on twinkies, candy, snacks, and other unhealthy items that have no place in taxpayer funded food programs.

Call your congressman today and demand that that food items for purchase with food stamps be limited to only the necessities. It's time to show the mooching class that the free ride is coming to an end.

RKS's picture

While your idea sounds simple, think about low income areas and the 'hood in Atlanta. The stores that people can get too often don't supply fresh fruit and vet. If they have no car, they aren't able to get to the big Kroger and Publix and Wally World to get all those things. Do we need to then regulate what food the stores offer? Require the farmer's to take foodstamps so they can get fresh stuff? I agree, too many poor people get crap to eat and it makes them plump and unhealthy, but mandating it, as in legislating how a person eats would be difficult.

S. Lindsey's picture

That's just a liberal cop-out.

Even our poor have a higher standard of living then then Middle Class in the rest of the World.

No being a criminal means you believe you DESERVE whatever you want that the other person doesn't and most likely just took "it" from the someone else.

Sounds like "You didn't build that" doesn't it...

"Whoever claims the right to redistribute the wealth produced by others is claiming the right to treat human beings as chattel."

-Ayn Rand

i am sick to death of all this claptrap about crimes being committed because one group of people has less than another group. We grew up poor. There were seven of us children. We were brought up to work for what we wanted. Just because we did not have something someone else had did not give us the right to take it from them. I raised my four children after my divorce by working two jobs, picking fresh vegetables from the fields after the farmers had picked their crops (with permission). I bartered for fresh eggs and many other things. I never even considered getting food stamps or other government help. These children were my responsibility. As soon as they were old enough they got part-time jobs to buy the extras they wanted. They all grew up to be hard working, law abiding citizens as are their children. None have ever been on welfare or any government aid. We have always felt that you help each other and yourself. That used to be the American way. Now the new American way is to see how much you can get without working for it---food stamps, free cell phones, etc., but yet Ipads and SmartPhones etc., seem to be a necessity as do all the other bells and whistles. We used to have pride in being independent and self-sufficient now the pride seems to be in getting as much as you can with no effort. This is one time that change definitely is not better. Unless we do a complete turn around we are doomed as a nation. Sad to say.

[quote]We have always felt that you help each other and yourself. That used to be the American way. Now the new American way is to see how much you can get without working for it---food stamps, free cell phones, etc., but yet Ipads and SmartPhones etc., seem to be a necessity as do all the other bells and whistles. We used to have pride in being independent and self-sufficient now the pride seems to be in getting as much as you can with no effort. This is one time that change definitely is not better. Unless we do a complete turn around we are doomed as a nation. Sad to say[/quote]

This change in attitude is not only seen in one segment of our country. There are many, unfortunately, who are not following the 'ethics' that made this nation strong. The majority of families in our country still take pride in working hard, achieving success, and providing meaningful service to others and their community. (Note Boston, Newtown, New York, etc.) Çriminals don't have an excuse -but they are often assisted to 'scam' the system (foodstamps) by unethical managers of the system. The 'unethical' are also criminals IMO. The American public knows what is 'wrong' - and reform is needed. We need to demand reform in taxes; welfare; education; etc. in order to heal. This disease - 'dis-ease' can kill us!

kcchiefandy's picture

...that 'unethical managers' may (and IMO probably) have their hands tied by failed policy. Most Gov't programs are directed by policies; 'street-level' administrators are often compelled to follow these policies/implementations regardless of their opinions/views. Believe me, 26 yrs in the Army and there were LOTS of things I wouldn't have done if not constrained by 'policy' or 'regulations'.

GuessI was just more of a renegade than you--In my 21 yrs,I did what I thought was right and yes,it caused me grief on occasion, but there was always someone who believed I was right there to bail me out!

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