Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015    Login | Register           

McIntosh grad killed in Atlanta robbery

A former Peachtree City man was shot to death during a robbery not far from his home in East Atlanta Village this past weekend.

Patrick Cotrona, a 1998 graduate of McIntosh High School, was one of three men accosted by an armed gunman during the attack, according to his older sister, Kate Cotrona Krumm. One of Cotrona’s friends was shot in the leg, but not until he was able to use pepper spray to fend off the assailant, she said.

Although their efforts were futile, bystanders tried to stop the bleeding from Cotrona’s wound and he was pronounced dead at Atlanta Medical Center after being whisked there by ambulance, Krumm said.

While they are reeling from Cotrona’s death, family members want him remembered for the way he lived his life, the love he gave and the irrevocable bond they shared growing up in Peachtree City.

Cotrona was an engineer for a video game company and had blossomed at Georgia Tech, Krumm said. The two shared a home together after college before she got married, for about three years.

“He was the best roommate I ever had,” Krumm said, adding that her brother had shunned corporate life for a more rewarding job despite the lower pay and benefits. It was more important to him to do something enjoyable, she said.

A minor in Japanese and a fan of anime, Cotrona once visited Japan on his own for two weeks and also spent about a week living in a Buddhist community, living as the natives did, Krumm recalled. He even went to a wedding once in South Africa, she added.

Cotrona, a video game engineer, was also a science fiction fan who was a regular at the Sci-Fi Dragon Con conference in Atlanta every year. As a child he was so academically sharp that he landed in his sister’s gifted classes though she was three years older, Krumm said. He was also very peaceful and avoided confrontation, she recalled.

A voracious reader, Cotrona was also a beer connoisseur, a joy he shared with his father Frank Cotrona. In fact, Patrick and his friends were walking to a nearby pub when he was gunned down.

Krumm said the family, including mom Paulette and sister Karen Cotrona Annis, plans to erect a memorial near where her brother was killed. They also are hoping for justice.

“My family, we want to remember this beautiful loving person who touched our lives in so many ways. Right now we don’t know when we will be able to find the peace because we are so traumatized by this grief, pain and shock over this horrifying, disgusting and depraved act,” Krumm said.

As the older sister of an academically-advanced brother who preferred books to outside play, Krumm recalled having to defend him over the years before he “blossomed” at Georgia Tech into the very social, amiable person he became. Now the Cotrona family is faced with a future without Patrick, a brother and cousin ... and also an uncle to two young girls “who will never get to grow up and know him,” Krumm said.

“We are trying to wrap our heads around something that we will never be able to wrap our heads around,” Krumm said. “... I don’t want the fact that my brother died over a few bucks to be the last of him. I want to protect other people. I want the community, the city, the police, the courts and the prison system to act. I want justice for him but also to prevent another family from going through what we are going through right now.”

In the meantime, the family will remember and celebrate Cotrona’s life and the legacy he leaves with them. For no criminal will ever be able to take that away from them, ever.

“Growing up, his head was always in a book,” Krumm recalled. “Our parents to punish him would send him outside. ... He learned so much just from reading the encyclopedia. He was also a sweet tender middle child to two sisters. ... He was also part of the Life Teen program at Holy Trinity Catholic Church.”

It was a life well-lived, even if it was cut far too short than anyone had envisioned.

“Dad said Patrick was the best in all of us,” Krumm said. “And it’s very true.”

Comments

This is just so sad and senseless. Patrick rest in peace. I did not know you or your family but I will now never forget you. This could have been my son or daughter. I will never understand violence like this. To the Krumm family ..god bless and remember the good times not this senseless act of an animal. Patrick lives on in our hearts.

Just vote. Citizens have given their lives for that right. Stop spending money we do not have. myself

So sad. When the coward is caught, this should be prosecuted as a hate crime.

Cyclist's picture

Ain't going to happen. We are talking about the city of Atlanta here.

What a waste. I hope they catch that POS thug(s).

My condolences to Mr. Cotrona's family.

Caution - The Surgeon General has determined that constant blogging is an addiction that can cause a sedentary life style.

G35 Dude's picture

Too bad the friend didn't have a .38 instead of that pepper spray.

You can't use logic with an illogical person.

Ad space area 4 internal

Government

The Georgia Department of Labor announced this week that the unemployment rate in the Three Rivers region in July was 7.1 percent, up five-tenths of a percentage point from 6.6 percent in June.

Sponsored Content

Opinion

When I was a kid growing up in Kingsport, Tenn., my next-door neighbor, and a few years older than me, was Lonnie Bailey. He was the coolest guy I knew.

Community

The 26th Annual Native American Festival & Powwow, sponsored by the Butts County Historical Society, is scheduled for Sept. 12-13 at Indian Springs Hotel/Museum, 1807 Hwy. 42 S.

Sports

Northgate 45, Shaw 0 Pace Academy 34, Our Lady of Mercy 3 Starr's Mill 21, Whitewater 7 Jonesboro 17, Sandy Creek 15 East Coweta 35, Arabia Mountain 28

Lifestyle

Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary W. Black is alerting Georgians to the recall of certain Jansal Valley Raw Macadamia Nuts distributed in Georgia due to potential health risk.