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Farewell to Arros

The Fayette County Sheriff’s Office said good-bye to one of their own today, K-9 officer Arros, who died in the line of duty helping apprehend four burglars in north Fayette County Aug. 3.

Law enforcement agencies from all over joined in the memorial service for Arros this morning at the Fayette County Recreation Department.

Following the ceremony, the sheriff’s office honor guard escorted Arros to his patrol vehicle one final time as his trainer and partner Cody Benslay drove him to the sheriff’s office complex where Arros was interred in a cemetery.

Prior to the ceremony, photos and videos of Arros’ law enforcement career were on display. One brief video showed him chasing down a suspect and detaining him by jumping around from side to side so the suspect had no avenue of escape.

Others who ran from Arros weren’t quite as lucky as that chap, however, said Fayette County Sheriff’s Maj. Bryan Woodie. He recalled the first suspect Arros ever caught, who had some choice words after the dog brought him down with a bite.

Sheriff Wayne Hannah said prior to the service that he admired Arros’ personality.

“I liked how he always had that smile like ‘I’m gonna get you!’” Hannah said.

Arros was one of the department’s first two “full service” dogs meaning they can detect narcotics, track missing or absconded persons, clear buildings and more, officials said.

But more than a law enforcement tool, Arros was a part of the sheriff’s office family, and his loss is sharply felt by the family of deputy Benslay, who kept Arros at home with them when he was off duty.

“These dogs become our friends,” said Lt. Dan Thamert, who heads up the sheriff’s K-9 unit. Thamert explained that he is so close with his two dogs that he often will find himself driving in his car having a conversation with them.

Often, Thamert said, the female bloodhound will reach through the partition in the vehicle to put her paw on his shoulder. One can easily imagine that Benslay and his family have had similar tender moments with Arros.

Thamert and others noted that the presence and support from numerous law enforcement agencies in the area was astounding and much appreciated. More than a dozen different canines were present with their handlers, and they lined up following the service to bid Arros farewell.

Arros died of heat exhaustion, having already apprehended two of the burglars that fateful day, and he was hot on the trail of two others when he began to wobble, and Benslay radioed for help.

Hawk 1, the sheriff’s helicopter which was helping on the case, landed nearby and rushed Arros to a local emergency veterinarian, but he could not be revived.

“He truly had given it his all that day,” Woodie said.

County Commission Chairman Jack Smith said while the loss of Arros would be strongly felt, it was important for everyone to remember his “life well-lived” and also his deeds and actions.

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Comments

There are members of the Fayette County community who feel your loss. Truly a life well lived.

Note: It's hard to be a doggie lover when you look like me (see my lovely puss off to the left here) but in THIS case, I make an exception.

Just to show Arros has a buddy waiting for him in police doggie heaven.
http://www.unionleader.com/article.aspx?headline=Weare+police+dog+succum...

DLB's picture

Arros, thank you for your service to our county. Rest in Peace.

A great American? He was a young dog. Apparently had something wrong with him. Dogs aren't as dumb as race horses who will run themselves to death if you ask them to do so! (They are also "great Americans") Dogs will not, unless sick in some way.

I have owned several dogs, as a kid, and for our children, and we took care of them all but we never considered them as great Americans! Just calming of the nerves dogs. (except for one Scottie, who was crazy).

Come on folks, this is police publicity! Do they really need this kind of thing? If we didn't appreciate them we wouldn't hire them. They are underpaid and selection would be better if they were better paid, it takes them too long to make a livable wage, then we end up with all Captains, etc.

Reminds me of "Trigger" and "Champion" now stuffed.

Are you truly that heartless? These dogs are a very important part of Fayette Countys police force. As a caregiver to these animals I am disgusted with your comment. You have no idea the ability of these dogs!!! They are just as important to our police force as any police officer rideing around SAVING OUR LIVES. Shame on you. I pray to God you are never in the position where you have to be saved by one of these four legged heroes, but if you ever are, maybe you will then understand why these animals are so important part of our community.
Also, in case you are unaware, these animals and all of their care including their training is completely funded by donations. Not your tax paying money.
SHAME ON YOU!!!

If I saw someone pounding on a tied up dog with a 2X4, I would down the pounder with a large rock and take the dog to a vet.
If I came across a batch of idiots who were having dogs fight one another, I would toss a bomb into the crowd!

Also, I do have knowledge of dogs ability. I have seen the military use them for some good some, nefarious purposes. The Germans used them to herd humans in WW2.

I have owned a dog who would bring milk cows home for milking and feeding from the hills! And also one who got with a pack and killed sheep. We had to shoot him!

The taxes part doesn't bother me but the policeman himself could be of more benefit without the dog. We shouldn't hunt humans with dogs. The only other benefit the dog serves the police is for photos, and recruiting school kids. Isn't there a Colonel in the Sheriff's office who doesn't do much except school publicity?
He ain't none too happy either pinned up in a caged car a lot. I know they leave the A/C running but he doesn't understand or appreciate that little favor.

I fear the time is near where Police and Firemen will be contracted to Halliburton to eliminate politics from a necessary force.

New Orleans and Detroit could sure use that right now!

No humor in your insensitivity. Classless.

NinaLynn's picture

Oh no ! So sad. I am truly sorry for his owner and the department as well. It's so tough to lose a "family member",animal or not.Sorry guys.

I'm glad your dog died.... :'(

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