Saturday, Sep. 5, 2015    Login | Register           

Disenfranchising of black voters

Regarding district as opposed to at-large voting, I don’t really have a strong opinion one way or the other, but this seems like a “Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander” situation.

With district voting, a predominately black district will, in all likelihood, elect a black person to the Board of Education and Board of Commissioners. So far, so good; that seems to be what the NAACP feels is right ... and maybe it is.

The other side of the coin is that a predominately white district will, in all likelihood, elect a white person to the BOE and BOC. Again, so far, so good; that also seems to be what the NAACP feels is logical.

But, because of the lawsuit, a black person living in a white district (and a white person living in a black district) now seems to be forever disenfranchised.

What have the citizens of Fayette County (black or white) really gained here?

Will this result in the Balkanization of Fayette County?

David Porter

Peachtree City Ga.

Location: 

Comments

How interesting to read the back-and-forth swipes of the NAACP and local opposition to a gerrymandered redistricting that favors election of a black representative. However, I hear no outrage over districts gerrymandered by major political parties to ensure specific elective outcomes. The Republican gerrymandering of the Georgia congressional districts is a prime example (as is Democratic gerrymandering in other states).

Until both mainstream political parties abandon gerrymandered districts in favor of nonpolitical, geographical redistricting, neither has standing to complain about other groups who emulate their tactics. All Americans should demand geographical districting on every level so that representatives are elected by natural, local neighbors instead of a rigged electorate.

[Quote]But, because of the lawsuit, a black person living in a white district (and a white person living in a black district) now seems to be forever disenfranchised.

What have the citizens of Fayette County (black or white) really gained here?[/quote]

The remnants of separate and unequal citizenship. We're changing, and districts representing a geographical area, regardless of the color of the residents, will select issues and representatives that apply to that residential community's concern.

Citizen_Steve's picture

Just to keep things honest here, David's Mom - your position is ideal to me, although it is at odds with the NAACP's position. They've specifically drawn district lines according to race.

I think it is totally backward to create a black district, as the NAACP is attempting to do. I believe their goal of segregation is largely driven by political gain for themselves and they see an advantage in having a more concentrated power base.

Steve

Ad space area 4 internal

Government

The qualifying period for municipals elections is complete. With that, the November election will see contested races in Peachtree City, Tyrone, Senoia, Fayetteville and Sharpsburg.

Sponsored Content

Opinion

In her book, “Kitchen Table Wisdom,” Dr. Rachel Remen tells the true account of a father and son who used to go mountain climbing together. Once they began their ascent, all conversation ceased.

Sports

Starr's Mill 31, Fayette County 14 Whitewater 14, Banneker 0 Sandy Creek 49, Hampton 6 East Coweta 24, Harrison 10 Northgate 56, Troup 6

Lifestyle