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Rick Ryckeley's blog

Fine china

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Few have reached the age of 100 unblemished by time and circumstances. My life has now spanned over three generations, and there’s really no telling how much longer I’ll be around. They say I’ve never looked better, but I know the truth. I’ve faded somewhat, have a crack and a chip.

The drawer

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It was there the entire time we lived at 110 Flamingo Street. No matter how many times we tried to get rid of it, the thing always seemed to return. With each move we made, Mom thought we were finally going to be free, but after only a few months in the new house, it found us once again.

Waiting

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Normally, I’m a happy kinda guy, and for good reason. Cool weather has chased the gray and black cat from the window sill back onto my lap. She takes up residence there during the winter when I write.

The fountain

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Finished with the morning walk, the old man slowly sat down on the one of eight wooden benches bordering the emerald grassy courtyard. The artificial knee was supposed to put an end to his leg pain, but it wasn’t living up to what the surgeon had claimed.

Once every third day

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Today, as I sit down in front of the computer, I find myself oddly at a loss for words. As a firefighter for over a quarter of a century and a columnist for the last decade, what do I write about, on this the tenth anniversary of 9/11, that hasn’t already been written?

Blinded by the light

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It started out as a typical day. The Wife reminded me of something I’d forgotten. Leaving for work, she gave me a hug and said, “Eye doctor’s appointment is at 10 today.” I must’ve had a funny look because then she kissed me and added, “You’ve already forgotten, haven’t you?”

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Opinion

Growing up at 110 Flamingo Street, I learned math many different ways, both in and out of school. When math was just numbers it was easy to understand.