Blogs

Dealing with barbarism: V-J Day and beyond

Dr. Marvin Folkertsma's picture

On Sept. 2, 1945, V-J Day, the funeral-like solemnity of the Japanese surrender aboard the USS Missouri was shattered by the thunder of 400 B-29 bombers flying overhead, accompanied by an additional 1,500 carrier aircraft.

In a bay packed with 260 Allied warships, the effect of such an overwhelming demonstration of power could hardly fail to impress. The aerial procession roared over the remains of an empire whose hordes had swept across Asia like a scythe of murder and annihilation for the previous decade and a half. Read More»

Needed: Intense face time with Vladimir

Dr. Earl Tilford's picture

President Barack Obama has spent a lot of TV face time opining on race relations in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 2009, on the George Zimmerman trial of 2012-13, on the riots in a St. Louis suburb last month, and plenty more.

His attention was fixed on fundraising in Las Vegas when terrorists attacked the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, on fundraising in New York when a Malaysian plane was shot down by Russians, and he was vacationing in Martha’s Vineyard while Russia furthered its aggression against the sovereign state of Ukraine. Read More»

The ones who lift you up

Ronda Rich's picture

Over the years, I’ve crossed paths with many who were extremely successful as well as some who were such miserable failures that, as Mama liked to say, “ain’t worth the breath they draw.”

Many are the times that I have pondered the difference between those who succeed and those who just seem to roll over and give up. Here would be a logical place to say that talent, intellect, ambition, energy and common sense paves the way to achievement while laziness, poor decisions and addictions throw obstacles in the way. Read More»

Y2K

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

This could just as well have been published in 2014. We’ve had more mysterious glitches recently,15 years since Y2K....

From news services: Air traffic controllers across New Zealand, unable to communicate with each other as a result of a computer glitch, scramble to locate scores of flights. A backup system is activated, no mishaps reported.

And this: Americans receiving parcels from Germany are advised to handle them cautiously and call police if packages are unexpected – or from Frankfurt. Read More»

Learning the hard way

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Last week I learned something the hard way, and believe it or not, the teacher wasn’t my dad. The teacher wasn’t The Wife. The teacher wasn’t even the world.

Nope – I learned my lesson early Friday morning from a 14-month-old little girl and a large brown and white majestic duck. It’s a lesson I will never forget. Read More»

Are youth the future of the church?

David Epps's picture

I have heard for decades the statement that, “The youth are the church of the future.” Usually church members and leaders use this phrase when there is a push to establish, sustain, grow, and fund youth ministries in the local church.

I was once a youth minister/youth worker in two churches. The first was a rather large congregation in Bristol, Va., and the other a mid-size church in Johnson City, Tenn. Read More»

What drives Miss Daisy?

Mark Westmoreland's picture

We adopted Daisy, a “dachshund mix” back in December. She’s a fine dog — of sweet temperament, faithful, a good companion. In fact, if there were an AKC standard for “dachshund mix,” I truly believe she would be collecting trophies and endorsement deals right now. But, alas, the elitists have yet to establish such a standard. Read More»

Slow pokes, round-abouts, and good ol’ kindness

Dr. David L. Chancey's picture

I don’t know about this new law that went into effect July 1. The “Slow Poke” law, House Bill 459, is designed to reduce tailgating, road rage and traffic congestion. If you’re driving in the left lane of a Georgia highway or expressway and some motorist speeds up behind you, quickly move over and let him pass or you could be ticketed. Read More»

Fluoridegate: What’s in your water?

Ben Nelms's picture

I was born during the first decade of the Cold War. In those days, and in many that followed, I was like most people probably were – I was taught by my parents, by politicians and in my schools to trust those in authority, to trust the federal government without question. After all, the government cared about us and protected us from harm. Read More»

Coddling children in Ferguson, Mo.

Terry Garlock's picture

On Monday, Aug. 11, a 20-year-old unarmed white man named Dillon Taylor was shot and killed in Salt Lake City, Utah, by a black police officer in questionable circumstances.

Taylor, a first-time father with a criminal record, had at the time of the shooting an outstanding arrest warrant for probation violations on robbery and obstruction of justice charges. Police had been called to a convenience store after someone reported seeing a gun. Read More»

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