Government

New college campus joins F’ville sewer

The Fayetteville City Council approved Georgia Military College (GMC)’s request to extend the city sewer line northwest from the existing line on Sandy Creek Road through a proposed road branching off from Sandy Creek and leading up to the college.

Around 1,800 feet of new sewer line is needed for the college, which is expected to open Aug. 15 next year.

The extended sewer line will cost around $171,906 in construction and $32,661 in engineering. Read More»

King, Pennington defend controversial PTC pay study

Peachtree City Councilman Mike King and City Manager James Pennington. Photos/Ben Nelms.

Some residents lash out at study, others say PTC employees deserve the raises
Read More»

Fayette BoE to visit local schools’ career programs

Sign in front of the Fayette County School System's central office. File photo.

It was billed as an update of a potential partnership between the Fayette County School System and Southern Crescent Technical College (SCTC). Read More»

PTC to piggyback on county's dredging bid

City's decision on dredging will come after the cost is known

It did not take long for the Peachtree City Council at the Nov. 20 meeting to agree to have potential areas for dredging included in Fayette County’s bid for upcoming dredging work on Lake Peachtree. Read More»

Barlow apologizes for tirade against ‘Demoncrats’

Fayette County Commissioner David Barlow in a file photo from January 2014.

Fayette County Republican Commissioner David Barlow says, “I was wrong,” and issued an apology Nov. 19 for his remarks at the Nov. 13 meeting of the Fayette County Commission where, among other comments, he decried the current treatment of conservative Christians by liberal “Demoncrats.”

After a firestorm of criticism from both parties, Barlow said:
Read More»

Pennington faces PTC pay hike questions at Nov. 20 meeting

Peachtree City Manager James Pennington at a Nov. 6, 2014 council meeting. Photo/Ben Nelms.

Councilwoman Kim Learnard seeks answers; pension costs are disputed
Read More»

Fayette: ‘We don’t need new pay study’

After seeing the controversy about a pay study that erupted in Peachtree City recently, and after more than an hour of discussion at its Nov. 13 meeting about a proposed classification and compensation study, a majority of the Fayette County Board of Commissioners decided that they didn’t want any study right now. Read More»

Question: Why dredge? And why now for Lake Peachtree?

City-provided map showing proposed dredging zones in Lake Peachtree.

Even though no compelling reason for Peachtree City spending up to $1.3 million to dredge large portions of what was Lake Peachtree has been offered to the public, the City Council will decide this week whether to green-light the digging — and the expenditure.

The $1.3 million is equivalent to three-quarters of a mill in the city property tax rate, and it’s not included in the recently adopted city budget. One mill in the Peachtree City property tax rate produces $1.725 million in revenue. Read More»

New north Fayette fire station opens

The opening of Fayette County Fire Station No. 3 on NOv. 19 was attended by host of firefighters and elected officials from around Fayette County. The new north Fayette station is located on Jenkins Road at Ga. Highway 74. Photo/Ben Nelms.

It was years in the making but on Nov. 19 the completed Fire Station No. 3 on Jenkins Road at Ga. Highway 74 was unveiled. Funded by the Fayette County Fire Fund, the 9,600 sq. ft. station in north Fayette County is situated on 6.6 acres and will accommodate fire service needs for the next half-century.

The opening was attended by firefighters from in and around Fayette and Fulton counties and by elected officials from Fayette County, Tyrone and Peachtree City. Read More»

Fayette BoE sets policy for using its reserves of 10%

Superintendent Joseph Barrow. File photo.

The Fayette County Board of Education on Nov. 17 adopted a policy that will require an annual reserve fund up of to 10 percent of general operating fund revenues. Expenditures from the reserve fund must be approved by the school board.

The school system for the past two years has kept a 10 percent reserve in the budget, though it came with no policy to regulate how the funds could be spent. Read More»

Recent Comments