Opinion

Liberty charter vote a wise financial decision

Recently our neighbor Dr. Dana Spears, Ph.D. expressed her concern that our Fayette County Board of Education decided not to make Liberty Tech Charter School part of our excellent Fayette County public school system, but rather supported Liberty’s goals and expressed hope that the state of Georgia would approve Liberty as a state charter school. The difference is money. Read More»

‘Mean’ headline for Little League story

My son is a player on the PTCLL team which won the Georgia State Championship. I’m writing to let you know how disappointed I am at the headline that was chosen when they were disqualified from the Southeastern Regional Tournament. Read More»

New EPA regs could affect rates

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to release regulations to limit carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at existing power plants. The result could be more expensive electricity for Coweta-Fayette EMC’s service area residents. This means less money in your pocket.

On July 29, the EPA held their first “listening session” in Atlanta. At the meeting, many electric cooperative and utility leaders from Georgia and other surrounding states voiced their deep concerns about the economic and other unintended consequences that the carbon dioxide emission regulations could bring about. Read More»

These “Turtles” should have stayed in the shells

The Citizen's picture

By KEVIN THOMAS

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Childhood is an interesting time. We are young, inexperienced, and easily entertained. When we are children, all we need is a talking animal and we like what is right in front of us. That was the case for me at least.

I remember seeing “Shrek” in the movie theater when I was six years old, being entertained by a fast-talking donkey and an ogre with anger issues. I also loved anything having to do with “Scooby-Doo” because there was a talking dog who solved mysteries. Read More»

Mea Culpa in Kitchen

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

Feel the need to come clean in a couple of borderline deceptive actions recently.

One problem with co-existing with a chronic disease is that you may try to take advantage of it. Not a really bad habit, I suppose, but I’ve got to watch closely the tendency to use it for unearned benefits. Read More»

Sticks and Stones

Rick Ryckeley's picture

On the first day of school, most kids worry about something. Some worry about their clothes, others the way their hair looks. Still others worry if they’ll be unlucky enough to get that one teacher that nobody wants to get. So what was the one thing yours truly worried about while attending the world of academia, you might ask? Well, it wasn’t just one thing. It was three. Read More»

Christians in Mosul face death

David Epps's picture

For the first time in 1,600 years,the Christian Mass is not being celebrated in the ancient city of Mosul, Iraq.

According to a story in The Daily Beast, The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) seized Iraq’s second largest city June 10, causing most Christians in the region to flee in terror. The remnant of Mosul’s ancient Christian community, long inhabitants of the place where many believe Jonah to be buried, now faces annihilation behind ISIS lines. Those who risk worship must do so in silence, praying under new Sharia regulations that have stilled every church bell in the city. Read More»

It all begins with R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Bonnie Willis's picture

Arguably, some of the most inspiring words in a speech were when President Obama stated, “We are not a collection of red states and blue states. We are the United States of America.”

Because of those words, many Americans believed he would bring about healing to our nation and help bridge our economic, racial, and socio-political divide. Six years later, however, just the opposite has happened. There are even greater numbers of poor and dependents, and the political and social discourse is even more divisive, caustic, and non-productive than it has ever been. Read More»

WWI, the not-so-great war

Cal Thomas's picture

NEWBURY, England — World War I began as most wars do with patriotic fervor and predictions of a quick end. It lasted four years.

While the match igniting the “war to end all wars” was lit by the assassination of Austria’s Archduke Ferdinand on June 28, 1914, formal declarations of war occurred 100 years ago on July 28 (Austria declares war on Serbia) and Aug. 1 (Germany declares war on Russia, and Russia on Germany). Aug. 1, 1914 was commemorated Sunday at a charity event to benefit current British war veterans at Highclere Castle, the site of the PBS series “Downton Abbey.” Read More»

Western anti-Semitism unleashed

Walter Williams's picture

Navi Pillay, U.N. high commissioner for human rights, has accused both Israel and Hamas militants of committing war crimes in the Gaza conflict. Her harshest criticism, as well as that of most nations, has been reserved for the Israeli government, charging that it has committed war crimes in direct violation of the Geneva Conventions. Read More»

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