Opinion

Somebody doesn’t know what’s up

In the Sept. 24, 2014 issue of The Citizen, the headline article on Page 1 was entitled, “Young adults wave goodbye to Fayette.” On Page 3 there was an article entitled, “Peachtree City prepares for 1,329 new residents.”

The first article noted that Fayette County leads the nation in the exodus of millennials (age 28 and younger) that are leaving for other communities.

The second article noted that the proposed Crestwood subdivision would have 650 “age-restricted units for persons 55 and up” (almost half of the proposed 1,329 units). Read More»

Seeing cops through race-colored glasses

In response to David Browning, “How could cop shoot unarmed man 6 times?”

Easy.

Just like the two East Point, Ga., officers tazed a man they caught up with after chasing him down. A man who was unarmed, out of breath, sitting on the ground, fully winded and presenting no immediate danger to the two officers. Yet they tazed [shocked]this partially incapacitated man so many times he died.

How could two cops taze an unarmed man so many times he died? Read More»

Youth football game raises sportsmanship questions

This weekend, the 10-year Rec Chiefs took to Riley Field to face their fourth opponent of the year. There was a good crowd and the cheerleaders were there. The boys, most of whom are playing football for the first time this year, were excited for a good game. Read More»

BP, lawyers and the environmental trough

I would like to give another side to David Browning’s letter of Sept. 17. In the first place I would not consider it gross negligence, only negligence. It could be gross negligence not drilling for oil off the coast of California that regularly washes up on the beaches because of natural leaching from the ocean floor. Read More»

Irony, part deaux

Sallie Satterthwaite's picture

This column originally ran Sept.29, 1998.

Hooray, I thought, when AAA in Wilmington, N.C. let me borrow a telephone line to e-mail a story back to The Citizen. After an embarrassing failed attempt at the local newspaper office, I was in business now.

But when I was ready to send, I got the same perplexing message: No Dial Tone. I switched a telephone to the jack I was using and got a dandy dial tone — just not with the computer.

Stay calm, I told myself, clammy with frustration — not to mention dread of telling Dave he had been waiting in the parking lot for nothing. Read More»

'Could you be more specific?'

'Could you be more specific?'

Glenn McCoy editorial cartoon — Secret Service radio call: "Agent Smith, do you see anyone at the White House that doesn't belong there?" Agent relies, "Could you be more specific?"

'I can help you throw away your medal'

'I can help you throw away your medal'

Cip Bok editorial cartoon — Secretary of State John Kerry to President Barack Obama: "I can help you throw away your medal."

You'll never go wrong...

Rick Ryckeley's picture

Got an urgent phone call from The Boy yesterday. The serious tone in his voice immediately captured my attention. So much so that the ribbing I was going to give him about Little One kissing a duck while feeding them out at Twin Lakes that very morning would obviously have to wait.

He said, “Dad, I need your advice about what to do.”

I must say, hearing those words made me feel good. Not because The Boy was asking for advice in his time of difficulty, but because he had asked ME for it. Read More»

The lesson of corporal punishment

David Epps's picture

According to a report in GOPUSA, “Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson says he never intended to hurt his 4-year-old son when he hit him with a tree branch (switch). But experts in childhood development said the intent doesn’t matter — striking a child is never appropriate.” Apparently, my parents never got the memo.

I was, what was called in my neck of the woods, a “precocious” child. One definition of “precocious” is “ahead in development, such as the mental development of a child.” Read More»

War — A matter of semantics

Dr. Earl Tilford's picture

“Mankind must put an end to war, or war will put an end to mankind.”
— President John F. Kennedy

For most people, war is an unthinkable horror. While generals must think realistically about war, an important duty for a political leader is to inspire others to do the unthinkable.

Modifiers attempt to qualify war with words like limited, total, defensive, preemptive, just, unjust, good, bad, glorious, tragic, legal, illegal, etc. Read More»

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